203-335-3223

Voted Best & Top Plastic Surgeon in Fairfield County & Connecticut

I am so happy for this new dimension in my life. There is energy and lightness, fun and satisfaction coming from this transformation. Thank you for guiding assisting, and completing this most interesting process. I remain a believer in your artistry and skill—yet amazed by it. DS

Jeffrey Rosenthal MD
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon l Former, Chief Plastic Surgery at Bridgeport Hospital

140 Sherman Street, Fairfield, CT 06824
Rosenthal Cosmetic Surgery & Skin Care Center

"Where Art Meets Science"

Articles about Dr. Rosenthal

A Letter From The QUEEN:

queens letter to me-page-001Photos From South Africa

emo3 emo4 emo2 emo1

.

.

. . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

 .

.

.

.

 

.

.

.

.

.

..

.

 

 

The Future Of Medicine Is Here

Physicians are employing new advances

by Beth Coone

.

Cosmetic Medicine

Revolutionizing Fillers The popularity of injected neurotoxins and dermal fillers is rising says plastic surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal, former chief of plastic surgery at Bridgeport Hospital and founder of Rosenthal Cosmetic Surgery & Skin Care Center in Fairfield. He attributes this to the desire of his patients to take the least invasive route possible to the fountain of youth, and notes that the proliferation of such procedures has given aesthetics experts and their patients a viable alternative to surgery. “All of these innovations have given us the ability to sculpt, lift and contour in ways we once might not have imagined possible. It’s a big revolution and one that will continue to change how we treat cosmetic alteration.” In the future Dr. Rosenthal sees innovations focused on how long fillers last and transforming how they are cultivated. “The downside of all these things is the frequency [in which] you need them… I think there’s going to be a demand to see things that don’t need to be done so often.” How long? “Something like two years might be ideal and even possible,” says Dr. Rosenthal. Still, he stresses there’s also a “downside” to dermal fillers that last “too long.” The actual benefit of “fillers is that they are temporary and you can make adjustments over time to address the natural aging process. A permanent filler would probably be something most people would come to regret over time.” On the Horizon Dr. Rosenthal predicts research and development focused on creating “self-generated” fillers cultivated from one’s own stem cells to create injectable face plumpers. “Plastic surgery has always been at the advent of stem cell research, and now the thinking is [whether] we can isolate fat cells and find a way to inject them back into the body.” He also notes that while the idea of using stem cells is intriguing, research, is ongoing. Indeed, the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery recently noted that while some doctors already claim to offer stem cell transplant “face lifts,” they are not a legitimate protocol yet.

Local Surgeon Recognized For Photography And Artwork

by Robert Held Click Here To Read

Beyond Botox

Everything you’ve always wanted to know but were afraid to ask (enter our judgment-free zone)

by Riann Smith Click Here To Read.

Interview for Plastic Surgery News

The seeds of art

Jeffrey Rosenthal, MD, Fairfield, Conn. Chief of Plastic Surgery at Bridgeport Hospital, always marched to the beat of his own drum, creating things that were beyond the ken of his then-young classmates. “I recall that in social studies class I had a project that involved the explorers Lewis and Clark. I made a big relief map instead of just a drawing,” he recalls. “ Later, in biology class, I drew a picture of the human body, which always fascinated me, and used a pump and plastic tubing to show how fluid coursed through the veins. In another course, I made an incandescent bulb out of a glass jar, wire and transformer.” “I really enjoyed black-and–white photography and then developing and printing the images in a inspired way, while in college. In medical school, I decided that I wanted to learn how to draw with pen and ink, so I bought pen and paper. During one psychiatry class I was drawing an Oriental couple with an umbrella. The instructor walked by, looked at it and smiled. He didn’t bother me about it, I was lucky it was a psych. professor,’ Dr. Rosenthal says. “ I was always creative in doing things, but not in the standardized prosaic form of art such as drawing, painting or creating music. Even in my earlier years, I remember sitting for hours, creating things with blocks, just designing, and using my imagination kept me enthralled,” he adds. Preferred medium Dr. Rosenthal is a self-trained artist, author and poet who feels his lack of formal training works in his favor. “I’m not conversant with all the theories and standard methods of art, so I have no limitations on what I can or can’t do; I have no boundaries.” he maintains. Therefore, his choice of media is as limitless as his imagination. “ I pick up leaves, stems and flowers that strike my eye, and I will paint with them, make impressions on canvas or paper,” he says. “I once went to an art store and saw acrylic paste and asked, “ What happens if I mix the paste with paint?” I bought it and mixed it up, the result being a medium that was almost like using oil paint: there’s a thickness and texture to it that I use for layering. It’s like having a three-dimensional painting on my walls. I now use the mixture often and even pipe it out, like a baker decorating a cake.” Art and Plastic Surgery Dr. Rosenthal finds that the challenges of art are somewhat similar to other challenges he faces in life, including plastic surgery. “ I love the process of creating and of thinking how I’m going to get something done. I have always been of the ilk that if I set my mind to it, I can accomplish it. Even if I don’t know how to do it now, that doesn’t mean that in a week, month or year’s time, I won’t come up with the answer on how to do it.” “ My artistry is not limited to canvas or a hunk of clay,” Dr. Rosenthal adds. “It’s all in how I view my surroundings, and since I’m uninhibited in my thought process, I can just pick anything up and think, “ why can’t I do this?” “That’s how I approach the art of plastic surgery. All of my procedures are tailored to compliment my patients’ individual needs. I’m using multi-dimensionality when I’m working in clay, wood and stone; when you make a cut in the latter two, you can’t go back again; it’s finished. So you have to contemplate each move four or five times in advance of the first. That’s the way I perform my surgery: I plan it, run through each phase repeatedly and then execute the operation, knowing what I’ll be doing several steps beyond the one I just completed,” he says. Personal work “ My patients see my art hanging in my office,” Dr. Rosenthal notes,” often they either wish to see additional art pieces or purchase one of them. But I tell them, the only art I ever “sell” is when I “sculpt” upon one my patients.” “To me, working on the human body is really the highest form of art I know”. My art is all unique, each piece is very personal to me, so I couldn’t bear to part with it.” I give away so few things because each piece has a special meaning to me. An exception being a broach I designed and a painting of flowers that I made for my wife Catherine; so she can always have a fresh bouquet at hand. She also has a suede sports coat that I designed and had finished in Mexico,” Dr. Rosenthal explains. Having fun “If I weren’t a Plastic Surgeon, I wouldn’t be a physician”, notes Dr. Rosenthal, whose children’s books, paintings, masks, sculptures and photographs have been the focus of many art shows. “There’s no other field in medicine that would allow me to create, be artistic and inventive. I approach things from many vantage points, I like to reflect a lot, which allows me to care for my patients in a caring and thoughtful manner.” “I am really amazed when someone says you cannot do something. There is always a way to accomplish your goals,” Dr. Rosenthal believes. “ You just have to find the right path in order to reach that end point”. “ It is do-able.”

Fairfield Citizen

Through Art, Plastic Surgeon Makes A Creative Nip

BY MICHELE HERRMANN Friday, October 07, 2005 – mherrmann@bcnnew.com Plastic surgery and art go hand in hand for Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal. As a plastic surgeon, he compares the steadiness and precision required in his profession to a sculptor carefully carving a piece of stone or metal into a finished masterpiece. “Once you make a cut you can’t go back,” Rosenthal said. “You have to plan ahead and conceptualize what you want.” Describing himself as a self-taught artist, Rosenthal has extended his creative merits beyond using carving tools. Along with sculpturing in metal, copper or stone, he paints, writes poetry, takes photographs and even mats and frames his paintings and pictures. “I guess it’s a little obsessive, but it’s my art and I want it to be representative of me,” Rosenthal said. His work graces the interior of his Kings Highway Cutoff office. His pieces have been displayed at public venues too, such as Fairfield University’s Thomas J. Walsh Art Gallery, in August 2002, and Gallerie Je Reviens in Westport, in June 2004, and overseas at a gallery in Fanjeaux, France, with French artist Mogart, also during last year. A sample of his paintings and photography will be on view and available for purchase starting this Friday, Oct. 7, and continuing through Friday, Dec. 30 at the Discovery Museum, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport. The public is welcome to an opening benefit reception Friday, Oct. 14, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the museum. A portion of the art proceeds will be donated to the museum and the Norma F. Pfriem Breast Care Center. Rosenthal decided to show his art publicly after his patients said they wanted to see more of his work than what could be displayed in his office. All of his public exhibitions have aided and acknowledged the center, to which Rosenthal has a personnel connection. A close family relative, who has diagnosed with breast cancer, received treatment there. He added that he also wants other women to learn about the center. “I saw how nurturing and caring the center was for women, who were in need of that, at that time in their lives, when [they] are going through chemotherapy,” said Rosenthal. “The people who work there are caring and giving. I have always been appreciative of what they did and I want to give back to them.” Rosenthal had been in talks with the Discovery Museum about showing his art there, according to the museum’s Executive Director Linda Malkin. The late Norma F. Pfriem, whom the Breast Care Center is named after, was a museum trustee who funded the addition of a food court and donated money to help to finish the completion of the museum’s kitchen-catering facility, according to Malkin. This exhibit marks the first time that Rosenthal will have his art for sale, a tough decision for him to make. Rosenthal said he prefers not to sell his originals “because they are one of a kind,” he noted, but added that the choice to do so resulted from his home and office becoming inundated with artwork. Along with paintings and photographs, glicees will be on display. Glicees are similar to images that are reproduced, realistically, by an ink jet. When asked if any medium is his favorite, Rosenthal said his interests go from one to the other. The time he devotes to his artwork could depend on his practice and his schedule. “Right now, I’m doing a lot of photography because I have the ability to crop and edit my photos and have them reproduced,” he said. Inspiration can vary, depending on where Rosenthal is. With photography, he said takes his camera when he travels. “I’m motivated to take pictures of people sitting or smiling or colorful scenes.” With painting, he said he might be looking at a structure and “making some notes” and then making a rendering of what he would paint. Sculpturing heads or busts is like a cakewalk, since he is knowledgeable about human anatomy. “I love to create. The creativity is what I get a joy out of,” Rosenthal said. “During the hours that I am working on my art, I am lost in that sea of creativity. I loose all track of time.” Rosenthal’s interest in art began early, at the age of 6 to be exact, when he was given the task of trimming hedges in the front of his family’s Long Island home. Perhaps it may have been his first taste for sculpture, no doubt. During his undergraduate years at New York State University College, New Paltz, where he majored in biology and history, Rosenthal said he was unable to enroll in art classes originally because he wasn’t majoring in the subject. In his senior year, he managed to sign up for a class in printing black and white photography. While in New Paltz, he also had the chance to make pottery and stoneware. He was able to carry out more art while attending medical school at the University Autonoma of Guadalajara, taking up pen and ink drawing. He continued his art, during his free time while in his plastic surgery residency at Nassau County Medical Center in East Meadow, N.Y. Rosenthal, who has been practicing in Fairfield for more than 20 years, is chief of plastic surgery at Bridgeport Hospital. For more information about Rosenthal’s exhibit at the Discovery Museum, contact the museum at 372-3521.

Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal, director of Rosenthal Cosmetic Surgery and Skin Care Center in Fairfield, says the effects of cosmetic surgery become a self-fulfilling prophecy – increased self-confidence after surgery leads the world to treat the patient in a way that is consistent with their higher self-image.

Mirror, mirror, on the wall

Cosmetic health care gains in popularity as stigmas fade

By DAVID TOTH The graying of baby boomers coupled with the growing acceptance of medical intervention to improve physical appearance has contributed to the growth in the cosmetic health-care industry, local medical practitioners say. “Baby boomers are reaching the magical (middle) age and they’re physically healthier and economically more stable than their parents, and they want to maintain that healthy glow,” said Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal, director of Rosenthal Cosmetic Surgery and Skin-Care Center in Fairfield. Longer-lasting health usually means a longer-lasting career. “There are a number of executives who tell me ‘I’m looked at as slightly older and I have information to give out, but people are not listening or looking at me because I look older.’” Figures released last year by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery show that surgical and nonsurgical cosmetic procedures in the United States have increased by 44 percent in 2004 to nearly 11.9 million from the year before. Separate figures for Fairfield County were unavailable. The most frequently performed procedure was Botox injection and the most popular surgical procedure was liposuction. For the most part, the stigma has gone out of resorting to medical intervention to improve one’s appearance, said Dr. Ben Schultz, owner of Brick Walk Esthetic Dentistry in Fairfield. “Cosmetic dentistry is a want, not a need. But nowadays, people don’t have any problems doing what they want to do, not just what they need to do.” Schultz cited shows such as “Extreme Makeover,” where contestants undergo cosmetic surgery to improve their appearances with making these options more popular in the mainstream. Common cosmetic dental work includes veneers, crowns and bridges as well as tooth whitening. Both Schultz and Rosenthal point to the crossover between cosmetic procedures. “The people who come to me usually do before or after they’ve done other types of surgery to improve their looks,” Schultz said. It is common for a patient to have already undergone breast augmentation procedures or liposuction before she settles into Schultz’s dental chair. Rosenthal said some people who undergo Lasik surgery to correct their eyesight suddenly see the wrinkles after they are no longer hidden by glasses and decide to improve various parts of their bodies. Schultz said most of his patients are in the 40-to-60-year-old category and that they span all income levels. “It is a matter of prioritizing. You can buy a new car, but that might last you only a few years, as opposed to spending the money on your teeth, which may be a better long-term investment,” he said. Rosenthal said his patients cross the generation gap, although he added that most facelift candidates are women in their late 40s and early 50s. Income levels of patients vary. “You don’t have to be wealthy, or have an obsessive-compulsive nature to (undergo cosmetic surgery),” Rosenthal said. He said the industry average income of a person undergoing cosmetic surgery is $50,000 a year. Both Schultz and Rosenthal believe in the life-changing power of well-executed cosmetic procedures. Schultz cites a 58-year-old female patient who started dating shortly after she had her teeth revamped. Rosenthal spoke of a woman who was interviewing in vain for jobs. After receiving Botox treatment, she was finally hired. “Obviously there are other factors involved; however, tension brings out the wrinkles in someone’s face and she believed she was being perceived as worried and intense,” Rosenthal said. In many ways, the effects of cosmetic surgery become a self-fulfilling prophecy as a person’s self-confidence rises after looking and feeling better and the world begins to treat them in a way that is consistent with their self-image. Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal, director of Rosenthal Cosmetic Surgery and Skin Care Center in Fairfield, says the effects of cosmetic surgery become a self-fulfilling prophecy – increased self-confidence after surgery leads the world to treat the patient in a way that is consistent with their higher self-image. Mirror, mirror, on the wall…
July 18, 2005

August 14, 2008

Skin Deep

Want a Face-Lift? First, Better Stop Smoking

By ABBY ELLIN LISA MORRISON has always considered herself a pillar of health. She ate only organic food, exercised often and meditated. The only glitch in her otherwise exemplary existence was the pack of Marlboros that she had inhaled daily since age 18. By the time Ms. Morrison, now 50, went to see Dr. Vincent Giampapa, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Montclair, N.J., she had tried everything to quit for the sake of her health. “Acupuncture, the patch, hypnosis,” she said. “Nothing worked.” Nothing, that is, until 2007, when Dr. Giampapa told her she would have to toss her beloved cigarettes if she wanted a neck- and eye-lift. “The doctor strongly suggested that if I wanted to heal properly I needed to quit,” Ms. Morrison said. “When you start talking about your face, it becomes motivating.” Each year, roughly 40 to 45 percent of the 45 million smokers nationwide try to quit, according to Dr. Michael Fiore, the director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, in Madison. Only about 5 percent quit for life. But these days, the growing number of cosmetic-surgery patients are motivated to quit for other reasons: vanity, and the threat of not being able to get a coveted new face, stomach or pair of breasts. “When someone hears this from an internist or cardiologist who says it’s really bad for you, it increases your risk of lung cancer, it’s bad for your heart, people tend to blow that off if they’re feeling well,” said Dr. Alan Gold, the president of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. “But if they have a medical problem and are not going for just a routine checkup, they may tend to listen to that advice more. “With plastic surgery it’s a little bit different. People are desirous of an elective procedure, and that’s their main objective in coming in. It’s something they truly want.” For the last 5 to 10 years, many plastic and cosmetic surgeons have refused to operate on smokers, especially those seeking a face-lift, tummy tuck, or breast-lift — procedures that require skin to be shifted. “Nicotine causes the tiny blood vessels in the skin to clamp down or constrict, which reduces blood supply to the skin,” said Dr. Darshan Shah, a plastic surgeon in Bakersfield, Calif. Complications can include poor wound healing, increased risk of infection, longer-lasting bruises, and raised, red scars. “Twenty-five years ago, it may have been more acceptable for a patient to have undergone surgical procedures while smoking,” said Dr. Patrick McMenamin, the president-elect of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery. “Nowadays if a doctor knew a patient was smoking and they did flap surgery,” he said, referring to an operation where shifting skin is required, “many of us would say that’s malpractice.” Plastic and cosmetic surgeons recommend quitting a minimum of two weeks before and after procedures, though some require longer to be extra safe. (Smokers also run the risk of infection and respiratory complications during anesthesia). For instance, Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal, the chief of plastic surgery at Bridgeport Hospital in Connecticut, mandates six weeks of smoke-free living before eyelid surgery or breast augmentation, and six months to a year before a tummy tuck. They also take it upon themselves to devise smoking cessation plans, prescribe drugs like Wellbutrin or Chantix and recommend hypnotists or support groups. “Why invest so much money in a cosmetic procedure for enhancement if the patient will not participate and do his or her part to help ensure the best outcome possible?” said Dr. Shirley Madhère, a plastic surgeon in Manhattan. Nancy Irwin, a therapist and clinical hypnotist in Los Angeles, said that plastic surgeons refer 5 to 10 percent of her clientele. “They don’t mind dying for cigarettes,” she said of her patients, but if smoking gets in the way of their breast enhancement, “there’s a problem.” “They’re putting image before health,” she said. Plastic surgeons cite a few reasons why now, more than ever, they require patients to kick the habit. In recent years, as the number of operations has skyrocketed — roughly 11.7 million cosmetic surgical and nonsurgical procedures were performed nationwide in 2007, up from 3 million in 1997, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery — more people (and smokers) are coming through the doors. Since most plastic surgery is elective, plastic surgeons have time on their side as opposed to, say, a heart surgeon. “You can talk to people about quitting smoking, but you may not have a month’s worth of time before you try to save their life with heart surgery,” said Dr. Roger Friedenthal, a board-certified plastic surgeon in San Francisco who refuses to operate on smokers. The arsenal of non-nicotine antismoking aids have grown, too. “With the advent of things like Chantix, we have a much higher success rate,” Dr. Shah said. (A caveat: this year, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning against the drug, claiming it can cause depression and suicidal tendencies in some patients.) Then there’s the matter of the cosmetic surgeon’s reputation. It can’t help business if a cigarette-loving patient ends up looking like the Bride of Frankenstein. “I take great pride in my work,” said Dr. Rosenthal of Bridgeport Hospital, who estimates that more than two-thirds of his patients who smoke quit for good. “I want it to look great for you as well as for myself. If they smoke even one cigarette, I run the risk of it not healing. It’s like trying to water your lawn with a crimped hose.” But all surgeons — and not just plastic or cosmetic — are increasingly urging patients to stop smoking before surgery, be it a face-lift or to repair an anterior cruciate ligament, Dr. Fiore said. It’s not as if cosmetic surgeons are responsible for a major uptick in smoking cessation, he said, adding “this is not a prime driver of quitting in America.” No doubt some patients lie about kicking the habit. “Some won’t, but will tell you that they have,” said Dr. Scot Glasberg, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Manhattan. “These are all adults, and I’m not going to be the person looking over their shoulders.” The fact that some plastic surgeons do no more than check the condition of their patient’s skin and smell for nicotine provides a substantial loophole. Others want proof. Dr. Samir Pancholi, a board-certified cosmetic surgeon in Las Vegas, obtains a urine test; Dr. Madhère asks patients to sign a legal waiver stating whether they have stopped smoking and acknowledging the postoperative risks and potential complications of smoking. Fear motivated Carolyn Davis, 42, a reformed social smoker in Sacramento, to quit cold turkey before her breast augmentation in 2005. “This was like the first major surgery I’d had as an adult,” she said, “so when my doctor, who I respect, tells me not to smoke and here are some reasons why — then I have to respect that.” (In the four years since surgery, she relapsed for just two days, she said.) Dr. Pancholi, who is certified by the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery, takes scare tactics a step further. He shows patients graphic postoperative pictures of smokers who didn’t heed his advice to quit. “They see the wound opening up, turning red or black, the edges start coming apart,” he said. “They see the skin graft we use to put it back together.” Margaret Pyles, 42, a human resources director for youth homes in Bakersfield, first went to Dr. Shah in 2004, looking to have a breast reduction. He told her that she needed to quit a minimum of 30 days before the surgery. A pack-a-day smoker since 16, she couldn’t face battling her addiction yet again. But once her back pain grew constant, and her abdominal muscles too flabby for her taste, Ms. Pyles went back to Dr. Shah last month for a breast reduction and lift as well as a tummy tuck and liposuction. But not before she quit smoking with the help of Chantix and a hypnotist Dr. Shah recommended. Both helped her overcome nicotine, she said, but fear really kept her on track. “I was afraid the anesthesia would go wrong, or I’d wake up coughing my head off and split my guts open,” she said. “And I was able to stop.” Ms. Pyles, who has not lit up again, is thrilled that her desire to turn back the clock may help prolong her life. “I was so focused on wanting the breast reduction more than I wanted the cigarette,” she said.

Spotlight on Jeffery Rosenthal, MD

- FCMA news capsule Patients are frequently surprised when they learn that Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal is also an accomplished artist. Dr. Rosenthal replies, “Many plastic surgeons are artists; we do art every day.” He feels that performing surgery on the human body is the highest form of art, combining the science of medicine with that of art to achieve a natural result. Dr Rosenthal is a board certified plastic surgeon in Fairfield, who specializes in cosmetic surgery and is chief of the section of plastic surgery at Bridgeport Hospital. When not operating on or taking care of his patients, you can find him working in a wide range of media: painting, sculpting, carving, or taking photographs. He also lectures on the danger of drinking and driving and has toured the state with the attorney general to rail against cigarette smoking. Jeffrey began his artistic quest at the age of six when he was given the task of trimming hedges, especially two mammoth bushes that adorned the front of his family’s home on Long Island. Pruning those shrubs taught him a lot about the art of sculpting in 3-dimension and prompted him at this formative age to consider alternative ways of producing a better result. It is this attitude that still motivates and gives him satisfaction in both medicine and art. Rosenthal spent his undergraduate years at State University College, New Paltz, a college with a long tradition of fine arts majors. His biology and history majors only allowed time for a few basic art courses, but he was able to continue with his enjoyment of photography. During medical school at University Autonoma of Guadalajara, he started pen and ink drawing – in psychiatry class! Later, he took up the mediums of sculpture and clay during (rare) free time while performing his plastic surgery residency at Nassau County Medical Center, East Meadow, New York. Having spent several decades developing an eclectic and lively art style, Dr. Rosenthal held his first major exhibit, “The Chance to Dream,” in the Walsh Art Gallery at Fairfield University in August, 2002. He demonstrated the wide scope and diverse nature of his art: paintings, photography, poetry, sculptures in stone, metal and wood – even a children’s book that he wrote and illustrated. The idea for an art exhibit came about when so many of his patients wanted to see more of his work than could be displayed in his medical office. His wife Catherine’s then recent breast cancer experience lead to the idea of using the opening night as a fundraiser for the Norma F. Pfriem Breast Care Center in Fairfield. June 2004 marked the next date Dr. Rosenthal would have an opportunity to display his work. “Infinite Visions” was borne out of gallery owner Marco Pelletier’s description of Jeffrey and his art. Gallerie Je Reviens, in Westport, known for its representation of French artists, was the site of Dr. Rosenthal’s photography exhibit. The first such exhibit at the gallery,
Jeffrey’s photographs were combined with paintings and glicees (the spraying
of ink at one million dots per inch to produce an amazingly realistic
reproduction of the image, consistent with an original painting (or photograph), a process Dr. Rosenthal embraces. Again, the Norma Pfriem Breast Center was the beneficiary of the opening reception.

Around that time, French artist Mogart, whose paintings are displayed in Westport’s Gallerie Je Reviens, needed a subject for her master’s thesis and found it in Jeffrey. She wrote portions of her dissertation on his artistic theories, many of which relate to his approach to plastic surgery.
She found the diverse nature of his work and creativity unique, especially since he was self-taught in his art. Inspired by their experience working together, they staged a joint art showing this past summer in Fanjeaux, France, to honor the Norma Pfriem Center and to celebrate the richness both countries offer. The two artists found a natural way to bridge their countries’ division through the greater vision they share, and to this end Jeffrey bestowed a selected work to the town’s mayor in remembrance of the mutual exhibit.

This fall, Dr. Rosenthal had the opportunity to once again showcase his paintings and photography – this time at a fundraiser
for Hummingbirds School, in SOHO. Hummingbirds is a non-profit school for individuals with special needs offering classes in dance, yoga, music and art. Proceeds from the fundraiser, which also included performances of opera, piano and dance by Martha Graham dancers, were donated to the school.
Dr. Rosenthal recently donated a glicee of a rose he grew and photographed to the American Red Cross. He is looking ahead to the possibility of having an art exhibit in England next year or wherever his art will bring pleasure. Indeed, his “infinite vision” will continue to be enjoyed by many.

Through Art, Plastic Surgeon Makes A Creative Nip

BY MICHELE HERRMANN Friday, October 07, 2005 Plastic surgery and art go hand in hand for Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal. As a plastic surgeon, he compares the steadiness and precision required in his profession to a sculptor carefully carving a piece of stone or metal into a finished masterpiece. “Once you make a cut you can’t go back,” Rosenthal said. “You have to plan ahead and conceptualize what you want.” Describing himself as a self-taught artist, Rosenthal has extended his creative merits beyond using carving tools. Along with sculpturing in metal, copper or stone, he paints, writes poetry, takes photographs and even mats and frames his paintings and pictures. “I guess it’s a little obsessive, but it’s my art and I want it to be representative of me,” Rosenthal said. His work graces the interior of his Kings Highway Cutoff office. His pieces have been displayed at public venues too, such as Fairfield University’s Thomas J. Walsh Art Gallery, in August 2002, and Gallerie Je Reviens in Westport, in June 2004, and overseas at a gallery in Fanjeaux, France, with French artist Mogart, also during last year. A sample of his paintings and photography will be on view and available for purchase starting this Friday, Oct. 7, and continuing through Friday, Dec. 30 at the Discovery Museum, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport. The public is welcome to an opening benefit reception Friday, Oct. 14, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the museum. A portion of the art proceeds will be donated to the museum and the Norma F. Pfriem Breast Care Center. Rosenthal decided to show his art publicly after his patients said they wanted to see more of his work than what could be displayed in his office. All of his public exhibitions have aided and acknowledged the center, to which Rosenthal has a personnel connection. A close family relative, who has diagnosed with breast cancer, received treatment there. He added that he also wants other women to learn about the center. “I saw how nurturing and caring the center was for women, who were in need of that, at that time in their lives, when [they] are going through chemotherapy,” said Rosenthal. “The people who work there are caring and giving. I have always been appreciative of what they did and I want to give back to them.” Rosenthal had been in talks with the Discovery Museum about showing his art there, according to the museum’s Executive Director Linda Malkin. The late Norma F. Pfriem, whom the Breast Care Center is named after, was a museum trustee who funded the addition of a food court and donated money to help to finish the completion of the museum’s kitchen-catering facility, according to Malkin. This exhibit marks the first time that Rosenthal will have his art for sale, a tough decision for him to make. Rosenthal said he prefers not to sell his originals “because they are one of a kind,” he noted, but added that the choice to do so resulted from his home and office becoming inundated with artwork. Along with paintings and photographs, glicees will be on display. Glicees are similar to images that are reproduced, realistically, by an ink jet. When asked if any medium is his favorite, Rosenthal said his interests go from one to the other. The time he devotes to his artwork could depend on his practice and his schedule. “Right now, I’m doing a lot of photography because I have the ability to crop and edit my photos and have them reproduced,” he said. Inspiration can vary, depending on where Rosenthal is. With photography, he said takes his camera when he travels. “I’m motivated to take pictures of people sitting or smiling or colorful scenes.” With painting, he said he might be looking at a structure and “making some notes” and then making a rendering of what he would paint. Sculpturing heads or busts is like a cakewalk, since he is knowledgeable about human anatomy. “I love to create. The creativity is what I get a joy out of,” Rosenthal said. “During the hours that I am working on my art, I am lost in that sea of creativity. I loose all track of time.” Rosenthal’s interest in art began early, at the age of 6 to be exact, when he was given the task of trimming hedges in the front of his family’s Long Island home. Perhaps it may have been his first taste for sculpture, no doubt. During his undergraduate years at New York State University College, New Paltz, where he majored in biology and history, Rosenthal said he was unable to enroll in art classes originally because he wasn’t majoring in the subject. In his senior year, he managed to sign up for a class in printing black and white photography. While in New Paltz, he also had the chance to make pottery and stoneware. He was able to carry out more art while attending medical school, taking up pen and ink drawing. He continued his art, during his free time while in his plastic surgery residency at Nassau County Medical Center in East Meadow, N.Y. Rosenthal, who has been practicing in Fairfield for more than 20 years, is chief of plastic surgery at Bridgeport Hospital. For more information about Rosenthal’s exhibit at the Discovery Museum, contact the museum at 372-3521.

Thumbtack Highlight

How did your practice start? Becoming a Plastic Surgeon is an arduous task. It requires 11 years of training after college, many levels of exams, along with certification by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. What was one of the greatest challenges that you faced during this process? There are many challenges to opening a solo Plastic Surgical Practice. One must first endure both physical and mental demands of residency before commencing the business of Plastic Surgery. Starting from scratch requires a focused business plan and a desire to be both a practitioner of medicine and business. The two are not always compatible if one wishes to care for patients in the best manner. It is a steep learning curve that requires dedication, passion, and a strong will to be the type of Plastic Surgeon I can be proud of. Fortunately, I have accomplished and exceeded these requirements over the past 28 years, and I continue to grow and alter my business, as evidenced by the entire revamping of my website, artofplasticsurgery.com, which will be unveiled in August of this year. How would you describe your usual patients in terms of needs and level of satisfaction toward your services? My patients are familiar with my credo in that I will take the time and make every effort necessary to achieve our mutual goals. Plastic Surgery that is cosmetic in nature requires a substantial consideration of what the patients’ needs are and how best to achieve their objectives. The satisfaction level of my patients is extraordinary because we work together with a mutual understanding. What do you think is the most effective strategy to keep patients happy and satisfied with your services? My patients benefit from my thirst for knowledge and my creativity. I am the Emeritus, Chief of Plastic Surgery at Bridgeport Hospital and I am fortunate to be the Plastic Chair Reviewer for a national medical review service that extends to 300,000 readers. Hence, I am privy to the newest and preeminent trends in Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery. Additionally, I am an internationally recognized artist whose artwork, including painting, photography, and sculpting, has been exhibited in Europe, New York City, and Connecticut. Being an artist opens up a whole other dimension in my ability to visualize, create, and sculpt a natural and rejuvenated appearance. What was your most successful and rewarding project? I give 100% of my energy to each procedure and operation so that my patient satisfaction level remains very high, as proven in our stellar patient reviews. In that I am both an artist and a Plastic Surgeon, I get great pleasure when I can use my artistic talent to sculpt and create a natural and refreshed appearance that balances the face. The “Rosenthal Liquid Facelift” is a group of non-invasive procedures that lift and smooth the face. First, I smooth out the forehead and balance the muscles with selective doses of Botox. In addition, by using Radiesse, a calcium-based gel product that can build up the patient’s own collagen, I am able to sculpt the cheeks as well as the arch of the face and jaw line to restore the lost volume, bringing about a lovely facial contour. Juvederm and Expression are hyaluronic acid products, similar to the substance found in our own skin. They plump up and hold water within the skin to smooth out lines around the mouth and add volume and shape to the lips. Finally, the skin, which is so crucial to looking our best is enhanced, with Intense Pulse Light (IPL), which reduces red and brown pigmentation. We also offer a wonderful line of skin care products used to refresh and preserve the skin. These are non-surgical facial procedures which, in the hands of a skilled artist, rejuvenate and enhance the face to create a beautiful appearance. Sometimes, however; the tried and true Facelift, Eyelid, or Brow surgeries are necessary to lift, smooth, and peel away the effects of time and gravity. In short, how would you entice your potential patients to book your service? My practice has always specialized in offering the combination of personalized care, surgical skill, and creativity. Most of my procedures and surgical intentions have been personalized to yield optimal results for each patient. I always take the time necessary to accomplish the objectives, yielding an appearance that is ideal for each patient. My unique combination of skill, artistry, and compassion attracts patients from both near and far.

Wine, Women and Wisdom

Dr. Jeffrey S. Rosenthal: Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and Chief of Plastic Surgery at Bridgeport Hospital Jeffrey Rosenthal, M.D., is a Fairfield, Connecticut Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and Chief of Plastic Surgery at Bridgeport Hospital. He has been in private practice for 23 years. Dr. Rosenthal specializes in cosmetic surgery which results in a natural-looking appearance that can only be accomplished by combining art and science. He uses his creativity and imagination to achieve balance and harmony, be it as a surgeon, artist, poet, writer, sculptor, illustrator or inventor. Dr. Rosenthal has said, “My art enhances my surgery by allowing me to be creative while embellishing the individual and personal identity.” His powers of visualization and imagination are coupled with skilled hands which allow him to successfully meld together art and plastic surgery. “Plastic Surgery is an art form that allows you to feel good about yourself by either restoring or rejuvenating a natural healthy appearance. The warm glow of contentment and confidence will permeate your life’s experiences.” “An art is a celebration of life and all the various nuances that give meaning to the newly formed day. There is a beginning to the artistic process, but never a definitive end. The blending of art and science has always been my artistic endeavor and I have found that there is no higher form of art than to sculpt and redesign the human body. I am hopeful that you will be moved by my art and that it will inspire you to feel the joy that comes from following your dreams.” He deems himself fortunate to have had three art exhibitions in France as well as showings in Westport and Stamford Connecticut; Discovery Museum, Bridgeport; Fairfield University, Walsh Art Center Gallery; and in New York City. How do art and plastic surgery fit together? “It is a unique privilege to sculpt and design on the human body; there is no higher form of art. The blending of science and art has always been my endeavor.” Dr. Rosenthal is a member of the Connecticut Plastic Surgery Executive Committee, Operating Room Committee at Bridgeport Hospital, Medical Executive Committee at the Surgery Center of Fairfield County, and the Connecticut State Medical Insurance Committee. Additionally, Dr. Rosenthal is the Chairperson for a national medical book review service. His reviews of plastic surgery texts and writing reach 300,000 subscribers and medical librarians in the country. He has lectured both nationally and internationally on plastic surgery topics and has had numerous articles written about his art in combination with cosmetic surgery. Likewise, these subjects have been discussed during appearances and interviews on both radio and television.

The Norwalk Hour March 2, 2008

Night of “Wine, Women, Wisdom” in Westport

by Michelle Tooker On March 3, 2008, from 5:30 to 8:30 PM, area women are invited to the Westport Country Playhouse for a night of sharing, embracing and spreading wisdom. Produced by Westport-based public relations boutique Connections, the event will feature a light catered dinner, casual atmosphere, three notable speakers and the opportunity to make new friends.

Robin Scarella, owner of Connections, created this event so women can experience an empowering evening with peers. She defines wisdom as “being open to hearing all different kinds of people speak,” and with that belief, the evening will be full of interesting discussions on topics pertinent to all females. “Women need to come together and enjoy each other,” she also said, noting that “connecting on a friendship basis is being lost.”

Scarella came to fully appreciate the value of solid friendships after battling a number of serious health issues. When friends quickly offered their support, she not only realized the importance of their assistance, but also that it is okay to ask for help—something many women are scared to do. So with that knowledge, her hope for “Wine, Women and Wisdom” is that the participants will not simply network, but also form new friendships, feel inspired to make changes, laugh and learn.

Lectures from three powerful speakers are the night’s focal point. New York Times best-selling author, Jane Green, will discuss the inspiration behind her novels and why women always get a second chance. Anne Keefe, Co-Artistic Director at the Westport Country Playhouse, will explain how her skills as a stage manager helped expand and solidify her current career. Keynote speaker, Dr. Jeffrey Rosenthal, a Fairfield, Connecticut Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and Chief of Plastic Surgery at Bridgeport Hospital, is going to discuss the internal benefits of natural-looking cosmetic surgery.

As an artist and surgeon, Dr. Rosenthal blends his creative talents with his extensive knowledge of science to individualize each patient’s results. For him, plastic surgery is an art form, and as with his sculpting, poetry, photography and other creative endeavors, he does not stop until he is satisfied with his work. His lecture will help women explore the benefits and downfalls of surgery, understand why cosmetic alteration is desired and what the realistic outcomes will be.

“Plastic surgery is not an end-all, but it allows you to put your best foot forward,” Dr. Rosenthal said. For example, “natural-looking eye surgery will make someone look more awake.” Plastic surgery may also improve psychological function and allow an individual to exude more confidence, and therefore give a better first impression.

Dr. Rosenthal involved himself with this event to resolve misconceptions about cosmetic surgery, and explain its positive psychological effects. He was also attracted to the evening’s informal, lighthearted structure coupled with the discussion of important topics, which will give attendees valuable information.

As for fare, spirits hail from Castle Wine and Spirits and the one-hour light dinner will feature hot and cold food, hors d’oeuvres and stationary items prepared by Collyer Catering.

“Ninety-nine percent of what we serve is made by hand, which is very unique,” said cofounder Reed Collyer. Getting involved with “Wine, Women and Wisdom” was an easy decision, she found, because Scarella’s energy and enthusiasm make it impossible that the event will be anything but successful.

Additional support for the event comes from Patriot National Bank, Go Figure Studio, Riverside Club and Spa, Bob Lebenson and AG Edwards. The Inn at National Hall is providing a raffle prize for two nights’ stay, and AGIDermatics, leaders in research for DNA repair of skin, will hand-out free samples their product Remergent, which reverses skin cell dysfunction and protects against skin cancer.

A portion of the night’s proceeds will benefit The Norma F. Pfriem Breast Care Center, which serves women throughout Connecticut. Dr. Rosenthal selected this organization, as Scarella always tries to incorporate a nonprofit component into her events.

Transcend, transform and triumph are the themes of the night, and participants are sure to do all three while connecting with new people and shedding preconceived notions based on social status and appearances.

Art of Plastic Surgery Fairfield CT